2001 NWS TAUNTON SEVERE WEATHER STATISTICS
(Through 10/19/01)
Send Comments or Questions to:
Joe Dellicarpini, Storm Data/Storm Verification Program Leader
Joseph.Dellicarpini@noaa.gov

 

A) TOTAL # OF WARNINGS ISSUED: 99
B) # OF WARNINGS THAT DID NOT VERIFY: 25
C) "WARNED SEVERE EVENTS": 87
[ Verified Warnings = 74 (A-B)
+ Multiple Severe Events
within same warning:= 13 ]
D) # OF SEVERE EVENTS WITHOUT WARNING: 27
E) TOTAL SEVERE EVENTS: (C+D) 114

These numbers are used to calculate severe weather statistics, which give a measure of an office’s performance. There are 3 statistics used in severe weather verification. The first is False Alarm Ratio, or FAR, which is the ratio of unverified warnings to the total number of warnings issued. The lower the FAR the better, since it expresses the number of "false alarms" issued. Probability of Detection, or POD, is the ratio of warned severe events to total severe events. A high POD is best, since it shows the skill an office has in warning for severe weather events. The Critical Success Index, or CSI, takes both FAR and POD into account to give a measure of performance that includes both verified and unverified events. As with POD, a high CSI is best. Finally, an average lead time is calculated for all warnings issued this year. Lead time is defined as the time elapsed from when the warning was issued to the time of the first severe weather occurrence in the warned county.

FALSE ALARM RATIO (FAR):

(0 is best) UNVERIFIED WARNINGS =   25  = 25.3 %
TOTAL WARNINGS 99

PROBABILITY OF DETECTION (POD):

(100% is best) WARNED SEVERE EVENTS =   87  = 76.3 %
TOTAL SEVERE EVENTS 114

CRITICAL SUCCESS INDEX (CSI):

(100% is best)         WARNED SEVERE EVENTS         =   87   = 62.6 %
TOTAL SVR EVENTS + UNVER WRNGS 114+25

AVERAGE LEAD TIME 20.0 Minutes

Least 0 minutes, Norfolk County 8/10
Most 50 minutes, Worcester County 5/28

HOW DO THESE NUMBERS COMPARE TO RECENT YEARS and NATIONALLY?