weather.gov 
 
 
 
National Weather Service Burlington, VT Twitter Page National Weather Service Burlington, VT Facebook Page
Local forecast by
"City, St" or zip code
  
 Current Hazards
    
 Current Conditions
    
 Forecasts
    
 Model Data
    
 Climate
    
 Weather Safety
    
 Miscellaneous
    
 Contact Us

August 2010
North Country Monthly Climate Summary

TEMPERATURE SUMMARY...

The month of August saw a wide range of temperatures across the North Country. Although many locations ended up warmer than normal by a degree or more, there were a couple of cool spells. The month started out with a warm stretch as temperatures rose into the mid to upper 80s. Record warm minimum temperatures were set at Massena, NY, and Mount Mansfield, VT, on August 5. That morning, the low temperatures were 69 and 63 degrees, respectively. This warmth was quickly followed by some of the coldest readings of the month as temperatures dropped into the 40s on the 7th. Temperatures moderated thereafter, and remained fairly close to normal through much of the rest of the month. Another cool spell came the 20th through the 22nd. The coolest conditions ocurred on the 22nd, when most areas struggled to get out of the 60s for daytime highs. However, by the end of the month, a hot, humid airmass built into the region. Temperatures soared into the upper 80s to around 90 areawide. Burlington set a new record for the daily high temperature on the 31st. The high that day was 92, breaking the old record set in 1993 by 4 degrees.

TEMPERATURE STATISTICS ACROSS THE NORTH COUNTRY FOR THE MONTH OF AUGUST...

  Burlington Montpelier Massena Saint Johnsbury
Avg. Temp 70.1 65.8 68.6 66.2
Departure +1.9 +0.7 +1.3 -0.6
Highest 92 on 31st 87 on 31st 90 on 31st 88 on 31st
Lowest 49 on 7th and 21st 42 on 7th 45 on 1st 44 on 7th

Below are daily temperature graphs for the month of August for Burlington, Montpelier, Massena, and Saint Johnsbury.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge


PRECIPITATION SUMMARY...

Precipitation varied greatly across Vermont and northern New York during the month of August. The highest totals were across the northern sections, and into the central Green Mountains. Monthly rainfall amounts here exceeded 5 inches, with many locations reporting over 6 inches. This includes Newport, which saw 7.44 inches, and Island Pond, with 8 inches. Elsewhere, totals were generally 3 to 4 inches. Most of the heavy rain across the north fell on the 2nd and 3rd, when a series of disturbances aloft interacted with a nearly stationary surface boundary and the warm, humid air that was in place. Two-day totals for this event were 1.5 to 5+ inches. Another heavy rain event occurred the 21st and 22nd. This was the result of a low pressure system stalled across New England and the mid-Atlantic states. The highest rainfall amounts were across Saint Lawrence and Franklin Counties in New York, with totals exceeding 2 inches. Isolated reports of more than 5 inches were also noted.

PRECIPITATION STATISTICS ACROSS THE NORTH COUNTRY FOR THE MONTH OF AUGUST...

  Burlington Montpelier Massena Saint Johnsbury
Monthly Total " 3.51 2.54 5.55 4.07
Departure -0.50 -1.47 +2.04 -0.14
Greatest 24hr 0.87 on 8th-9th 0.95 on 21st-22nd 2.40 on 22nd-23rd 1.61 on 3rd-4th
SNOW/SLEET
Monthly Total "
Greatest 24hr


BURLINGTON FORECAST AREA ACCUMULATED MONTHLY PRECIPITATION (IN INCHES) FOR THE MONTH OF AUGUST

Click to enlarge



BURLINGTON FORECAST AREA ACCUMULATED MONTHLY SNOWFALL (IN INCHES) FOR THE MONTH OF AUGUST

Click to enlarge

MONTHLY WEATHER PATTERNS AND GLOBAL CLIMATE DRIVERS...

The main 500 MB weather pattern during the month of August consisted of slightly stronger-than-normal high pressure across the eastern third of the continental United States, while an anomalously deep trough lay over the Pacific Northwest. At the onset of the month, the ridge lay across the south-central part of the nation, with a strong trough over eastern Canada and northern New England. By the middle of August, the trough had shifted over the Canadian Maritimes, allowing the high to build into the eastern US, and daytime temperatures to warm well into the 80s. The ridge was briefly squashed south as another strong low developed over the Great Lakes and moved into New England, causing temperatures to dip below normal and bringing heavy rain to the region. By the end of August, the ridge returned in force, becoming very strongly entrenched over the northern Great Lakes and northern New England. The month ended hot and dry as a result, with temperatures in the upper 80s to lower 90s and several days with no rain.

Click to enlarge

The Climate Prediction Center is forecasting both temperatures and precipitation to be fairly close to normal across the North Country during September.

La Nina continued to strengthen during August, as sea surface temperatures dropped to at least 1 degree Celsius below normal across the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Nearly all forecast models predict that La Nina will remain through at least early 2011, but disagree on the strength. As summer goes into fall, impacts from La Nina will begin to be felt across the United States. These include wetter-than-normal conditions across the Pacific Northwest, while the Southwest and middle and lower Mississippi and Tennesee River Valleys will be drier than normal. La Nina can result in increased Atlantic hurricane activity by decreasing wind shear over the Caribbean Sea and the tropical Atlantic.

CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER SEPTEMBER 2010 PRECIPITATION OUTLOOK...

Click to enlarge


CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER SEPTEMBER 2010 TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK...

Click to enlarge


National Weather Service
Burlington
1200 Airport Drive
S. Burlington VT 05403
(802)862-2475

Webmaster: Webmaster
Page last modified: September 12, 2010
About Us
Disclaimer
Credits
Career Opportunities
Glossary
Privacy Policy

Figure 1: Burlington Monthly Temperature Trend
Figure 2: Montpelier Monthly Temperature Trend
Figure 3: Massena Monthly Temperature Trend
Figure 4: Saint Johnsbury Temperature Trend
Figure 5: Monthly Precipitation Map
Figure 6: Monthly Snowfall Map
Figure 7: 500MB Geopotential Height Anomalies
Figure 8: Climate Prediction Center Precipitation Outlook
Figure 9: Climate Prediction Center Temperature Outlook