weather.gov 
 
 
 
National Weather Service Burlington, VT Twitter Page National Weather Service Burlington, VT Facebook Page
Local forecast by
"City, St" or zip code
  
 Current Hazards
    
 Current Conditions
    
 Forecasts
    
 Model Data
    
 Climate
    
 Weather Safety
    
 Miscellaneous
    
 Contact Us

September 2010
North Country Monthly Climate Summary

TEMPERATURE SUMMARY...

September ended up being a warm month, with average monthly temperatures some 1 to 3 degrees above normal in most locations. Summer-like conditions reigned for the first few days, as high temperatures soared into the upper 80s and lower 90s. September 1-3 was officially declared a heat wave in Burlington, with maximum temperatures topping 90 degrees each day. Several record daily high temperatures were set across the North Country during this time frame, including Burlington, Massena, Montpelier, and Mount Mansfield. Most of these locations set multiple records in a row. Thankfully, the heat was short-lived, and temperatures returned to near normal by the 5th. However, summer once again made its appearance later in the month, on the 24th. High temperatures peaked in the mid 80s across most of the area that day; Massena reached 87, shattering their old daily record high of 82 degrees set in 1968. Among these two hot spells, the North Country experienced some cool temperatures, as well. The coldest readings came on the morning of the 21st, when many locations dropped into the mid to upper 30s. September 26 was also a cool day; high temperatures struggled to get out of the 50s in many spots that day.

TEMPERATURE STATISTICS ACROSS THE NORTH COUNTRY FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER...

  Burlington Montpelier Massena Saint Johnsbury
Avg. Temp 62.7 59.5 60.8 60.0
Departure +3.3 +2.9 +2.4 +1.6
Highest 93 ON 1st and 3rd 89 on 1st 90 on 1st and 3rd 89 on 1st and 2nd
Lowest 39 on 21st 34 on 21st 36 on 21st 34 on 21st

Below are daily temperature graphs for the month of September for Burlington, Montpelier, Massena, and Saint Johnsbury.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge


PRECIPITATION SUMMARY...

Although September started out dry, it sure didn't end up that way! In fact, most of the month was very dry; many locations had seen less than 2 inches of precipitation through the 21st. However, things changed in a big way for the last week or so, as New England was situated in a more active weather pattern. The last part of the month saw multiple rounds of light rain, but, by far, the biggest event occurred at the very end of September, on starting the 30th and continuing into October 1st. One-day rainfall totals were impressive, ranging from 1.5 to 3.5 inches, with isolated higher amounts. Daily rainfall records were set at Montpelier and Massena. The heavy rain was the result of a low pressure system and left-over moisture from the remnants of Tropical Storm Nicole that moved up along the East Coast. Area rivers quickly rose over their banks, inundating fields and flooding roads.

PRECIPITATION STATISTICS ACROSS THE NORTH COUNTRY FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER...

  Burlington Montpelier Massena Saint Johnsbury
Monthly Total " 4.17 4.07 7.88 4.29
Departure +0.34 +0.75 +4.04 +0.82
Greatest 24hr 1.46 on 30th 1.91 on 30th 3.41 on 30th 2.29 on 30th
SNOW/SLEET
Monthly Total "
Greatest 24hr


BURLINGTON FORECAST AREA ACCUMULATED MONTHLY PRECIPITATION (IN INCHES) FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER

**Please note that this monthly total precipitation graphic was created with Cooperative Observer monthly data, which only includes rainfall up to 7 am September 30. Therefore, many of the reports shown below do not include the heavy rainfall that occurred with the storm that affected the region September 30 through October 1.**

Click to enlarge



BURLINGTON FORECAST AREA ACCUMULATED MONTHLY SNOWFALL (IN INCHES) FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER

Click to enlarge

MONTHLY WEATHER PATTERNS AND GLOBAL CLIMATE DRIVERS...

When averaged over the entire month, the main 500 MB weather pattern placed Vermont and northern New York in zonal, or west-to-east, flow. However, in reality, the month consisted of a series of strong ridges of high pressure and deep troughs of low pressure. September started with New England stuck under high pressure, resulting in record-breaking late-summer heat. This feature pushed east out over the Atlantic by the second week of the month, allowing a moderately-strong trough to follow in its wake. Temperatures dropped to seasonal normals and several rounds of light showers moved across the area through mid-September. Weak ridging returned thereafter, allowing temperatures to turn warmer, but keeping rain around as northern New England lay under southwest flow aloft. Big changes came right at the end of the month, when a very deep low pressure system, associated with remnants of Tropical Storm Nicole, moved up the East Coast, ushering copious amounts of moisture northward. This resulted in the widespread heavy rainfall of September 30.

Click to enlarge

The Climate Prediction Center is forecasting both temperatures and precipitation to be fairly close to normal across the North Country during October.

La Nina continued to strengthen during September, as sea surface temperatures dropped to 1.5 to 2 degrees Celsius below normal across the equatorial Pacific Ocean. Nearly all forecast models predict that La Nina will remain through at least early 2011, but disagree on the strength. As autumn continues, impacts from La Nina will begin to be felt across the United States. These include wetter-than-normal conditions across the Pacific Northwest, while the Southwest and middle and lower Mississippi and Tennesee River Valleys will be drier than normal.

CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER OCTOBER 2010 PRECIPITATION OUTLOOK...

Click to enlarge


CLIMATE PREDICTION CENTER OCTOBER 2010 TEMPERATURE OUTLOOK...

Click to enlarge


National Weather Service
Burlington
1200 Airport Drive
S. Burlington VT 05403
(802)862-2475

Webmaster: Webmaster
Page last modified: September 21, 2007
About Us
Disclaimer
Credits
Career Opportunities
Glossary
Privacy Policy

Figure 1: Burlington Monthly Temperature Trend
Figure 2: Montpelier Monthly Temperature Trend
Figure 3: Massena Monthly Temperature Trend
Figure 4: Saint Johnsbury Temperature Trend
Figure 5: Monthly Precipitation Map
Figure 6: Monthly Snowfall Map
Figure 7: 500MB Geopotential Height Anomalies
Figure 8: Climate Prediction Center Precipitation Outlook
Figure 9: Climate Prediction Center Temperature Outlook