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New Year's 2008
Winter Storm

The New Year 2008 continued the stormy pattern of December 2007 and followed on the heels of the New Year's Eve (12/31/2007) Winter Storm that delivered 4 to 8 inches of snow across Vermont with lesser amounts across northern New York. In fact, this New Year's Day storm followed the pattern set forth in 2007 of winter storms occurring on holidays (Martin Luther King, Valentine's Day, St. Patrick's Day and Easter).
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Infra-red Satellite and Surface Time LapseA strong upper level disturbance in the Pacific Northwest on Sunday (30th) moved to the Mississippi River Valley by Monday afternoon (31st) and through the Ohio River Valley and southern Great Lakes on Monday night before moving across New York and New England on New Year's Day.

At the surface, the primary area of low pressure moved from the Mississippi and Ohio River Valleys on New Year's Eve to the eastern Great Lakes and northern New England on New Years Day. Meanwhile, a secondary coastal low developed off the East coast during New Year's Day, eventually becoming the dominant storm system by nightfall.
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Evolution of Surface Low Track
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Radar and Surface Time Lapse  3 hourlyThis storm came in two phases to portions of the North Country, especially the Champlain Valley and the western slopes of the northern Green Mountains. The first phase of this storm was the snow that overspread the region during the mid-morning and continued through early afternoon Tuesday. This was associated with the main primary low and strong upper level disturbance that was moving across the eastern Great Lakes and the developing coastal low.

Snow was steady across much of the area with widespread snowfall amounts of 3 to 6 inches with locally up to 8 inches along southeast facing mountain slopes due to brisk southeast winds. Meanwhile, these brisk southeast winds that were promoting locally enhanced "upslope" snows on the windward side of the mountains was having an opposite effect on the downwind side like the Champlain Valley and the upper Connecticut River Valley due to a process called downsloping or "shadowing". In these regions, snowfall from the main storm system during the late morning and early afternoon was only a trace to a few inches. For example, by 7 pm EST, Waterbury had reported 8 inches of snow, while Williston/Burlington had an inch or less.
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31Dec2007_snowfall
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Radar Time Lapse of Wraparound Snows  30 minutesThe second phase of this storm system was a bit more localized to the Champlain Valley, the western slopes of the Northern Green Mountains and to a lesser extent the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont during Tuesday night and early Wednesday morning (2nd). The developing coastal low south of New England on Tuesday, intensified across the Gulf of Maine and Nova Scotia Tuesday night into early Wednesday morning.

The large expansive counter-clockwise flow around this coastal low, circulated moisture and precipitation back toward southern Quebec and the North Country, commonly referred to as "wraparound precipitation" . The combination of deep "wraparound" moisture traveling on north to northwest winds in the Champlain Valley created two local precipitation enhancement effects: the Champlain Valley Convergence Zone and upslope flow along the western slopes of the northern Green Mountains, which accounted for some significant snowfall that was lacking in the first phase of the storm.

In the end...widespread snowfall totals of 4 to 8 inches were observed with localized amounts of 10 or more inches along upslope regions on both the east and northwest facing slopes of the Green Mountains.
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02Jan2008_snowfall
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High Resolution Visible Satellite Picture on January 3rd, 2008
Infrared Satellite and Surface Time Lapse
Saturday Night at 7 pm EST (12/29/2007) to Wednesday Morning at 7 am EST (1/2/2008)


The coastal storm that delivered moderate snowfalls to the North Country on the morning of December 31st is shown developing across the southeast United States on the night of the 29th and moving off the New England coast early on the 31st before it rapidly intensified across Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. Meanwhile, a disturbance across the Pacific Northwest on the night of the 29th drops across the northern Plains into the Mississippi River Valley by the 31st, then across the Northeast on January 1st, along with a developing coastal low.
Evolution of Surface Low Track
Monday Afternoon at 4 pm EST (12/31/2007) to Wednesday Morning at 7 am EST (1/2/2008)


Surface low across the Mississippi and Ohio River Valleys late afternoon on December 31st moves across the southern Great Lakes during the night and then slows its forward progress across the eastern Great Lakes and New York on New Year's Day. At this point, a secondary coastal low develops off the East Coast during the afternoon of New Year's Day and becomes the dominant storm, as it moves across the Gulf of Maine and Nova Scotia during the night of January 1st and into the morning of the 2nd.
Radar and Surface Time Lapse 3 hourly
Monday Night at 7 pm EST (12/31/2007) to Wednesday Morning at 7 am EST (1/2/2008)


A surface low across the Ohio River Valley Monday evening (12/31) moves northeast across southern and eastern Great Lakes Monday night and Tuesday (1/1). The compact snowfall pattern immediately surrounding the storm center on the Ohio River Valley lifts northeast along a developing warm front and eventual occluded front as the primary system strengthens and stalls. Meanwhile, a developing coastal low generates another area of precipitation that moves across southern and eastern New England on New Year's Day (1/1). You'll notice a break in the action late New Year's Day and New Year's Evening, before a resurgence moves from north to south across the Champlain Valley during the evening into early morning hours of the 2nd.
Snowfall Map from reports received from NWS Official Spotters and Cooperative Observers on January 1, 2008
Radar Time Lapse of Wraparound Snows 30 minutes
Tuesday Evening at 5 pm EST (1/1/2008) to Wednesday Morning at 7 am EST (1/2/2008)


Snows from the coastal low are exiting eastern New England Tuesday evening (1/1) while scattered snow showers from the upper level disturbance continue across New York and Vermont. On Tuesday night around 10 pm EST (22z), composite radar shows a wraparound structure, typical for well developed coastal lows in the Gulf of Maine, developing and moving south across the Champlain Valley. This structure enhances after midnight EST (05z) on Wednesday morning (1/2) within the Champlain Valley and western slopes of the northern Green Mountains due to upslope flow (opposite from the downslope flow earlier in this storm) and convergence across the Champlain Valley.
Snowfall Map from reports received from NWS Cooperative Observers on January 2, 2008
High Resolution Visible Satellite Picture on January 3rd, 2008

A high resolution visible satellite picture shows the snow cover across the northeast United States after recent snowfalls on December 31st and January 1st.


National Weather Service
Burlington
1200 Airport Drive
S. Burlington VT 05403
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Page last modified: January 22, 2008
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