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February 26-27, 2008 Winter Storm
"One for the Record Books"

The snowstorm of February 26-27th was nothing spectacular, but the cumulative effects for the month of February and the winter season made this storm "record breaking".
Click to enlarge
Saturday night, February 23rd a storm was moving into the West Coast while high pressure was located across the Ohio River Valley and into the Northeast. By Sunday night (24th), the West Coast storm moved to the lee side of the Rockies and then slowly moved into the Mississippi River Valley by Monday night (25th).

Light snow overspread New York and southern Vermont Tuesday morning (26th) as the surface low moves into the Ohio River Valley. During Tuesday afternoon, snow overspread all of the North Country with moderate to heavy snow moving across central New York into southern Vermont.
Click to enlarge
Heavy snow moved across southern Vermont early Tuesday night as the surface low moved across southern New England, while steady light to moderate snow falls across the rest of the region. Light to moderate snow continued across Vermont and northern New York into the early morning hours of the 27th and then slowly tapered off to snow showers in southern Vermont and northern New York during the day.

Meanwhile, wraparound snows from the Gulf of Maine storm and locally enhanced upslope snows continued in earnest across northern Vermont, especially the northwest slopes of the northern Green Mountains through Wednesday evening (27th).
In the end, storm totals ranged from 3 to 6 inches in the St. Lawrence River Valley, 5 to 10 inches across northern New York and 6 to 12 inches across Vermont with the heaviest along those favored northwest slopes of the northern Green Mountains as well as some higher elevations in south central Vermont.
Click to enlarge
Storm total snowfall graphic shows the least snowfall across the St. Lawrence River Valley, the furthest location from the storm track. Other minimums in the central Vermont valleys were due to missing out on the wraparound feature with this storm.

Meanwhile, heavier snowfall totals were across the south-central and southern Green Mountains due to the closer proximity to the storm track and favorable southeast upslope during the first stage of the storm. The other heavier corridor of snow occurred along the northwest slopes of the northern Green Mountains due to the wraparound feature and upslope components in the latter half of the storm.
At the NWS Burlington office in South Burlington, storm total snowfall was 11.6 inches and this helped shatter snowfall records for the month of February as well as meteorological winter (December, January and February). The following are snowfall records for the month of February, meteorological winter and the snow season through February 29th at the NWS Burlington office in South Burlington Vermont.

TOP 5 GREATEST FEBRUARY MONTHLY SNOWFALL TOTALS:
1.) 42.3" IN 2008
2.) 34.3" (1958)
3.) 33.8" (1993)
4.) 32.1" (2007)
5.) 31.4" (1947)

TOP 5 WINTER SEASON SNOWFALL AT BTV: WINTER SEASON IS DEFINED BY
THE MONTHS OF DECEMBER, JANUARY AND FEBRUARY:

1.) 103.4" 2007-08
2.) 96.9" (1970-71)
3.) 81.7" (1965-66)
4.) 78.6" (1946-47)
5.) 75.7" (1969-70)

TOP TEN SNOWIEST SEASONAL (FROM JULY 1ST THROUGH JUNE 30TH)
SNOWFALLS AT BTV:

1.) 145.4" (1970-71)
2.) 132.0" (1886-87)
3.) 122.5" (2000-01)
4.) 116.9" (1992-93)
5.) 113.5" (1887-88)
6.) 111.6" (1965-66)
7.) 108.9" (1971-72)
8.) 107.2" (1993-94)
9.) 107.1" (2007-08)
10.) 104.6" (1969-70)
Click to enlarge
Snow depth graphic as of 7 am EST Saturday March 1st shows a very substantial snow pack across Vermont and northern New York. The least amount of snow cover was across the Champlain and St. Lawrence River Valleys with snow depths of 6 to 16 inches, while the southeast Adirondacks and Vermont, east of the spine of the Green Mountains range from 20 to 30 inches along the valley floors, 36 to 48 inches between 1000 and 2000 feet in elevation and 5 to 7+ feet along the summits.

This substantial snowpack could become problematic during the volatile March-April snowmelt season.

Time Lapse of Surface Maps (every 6 hours)
7 pm EST February 23rd, 2008 through 7 pm EST February 27th, 2008
Radar and Surface Map Time Lapse 3 hourly
7 pm EST February 25th, 2008 through 7 pm EST February 27th, 2008
Storm Total Snowfall Graphic for February 26-27, 2008
Snow Depth as of 7 am EST March 1, 2008
High Resolution Visible Satellite on February 29th, 2008

High resolution Visible Satellite picture from February 29th shows a snow cover across much of the Northeast, with the exception of the coastal plain south of Boston, including Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York City, Long Island and New Jersey


National Weather Service
Burlington
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S. Burlington VT 05403
(802)862-2475

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Page last modified: March 11, 2008
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