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WFO BTV Top 10 Weather Events of 2000 to 2009
Main 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

9.) December 2003 2 Top 10 snowstorms in 10 days 12-06-03 18.2 and 18.1 on 12-14-03
During a 10 day stretch in December 2003 the North Country received two significant east coast storms, which produced 2 top ten snowfalls at Burlington, Vermont. The first winter storm organized off the North Carolina coast Friday, December 5th and moved northeast to coastal Delaware Saturday, December 6th. The storm then intensified as it moved to Cape Cod by Sunday morning, December 7th, then into the Gulf of Maine by Sunday night. Snow developed across the area by late morning on December 6th, and became steady and heavy during the afternoon and evening. Another burst of heavy snow occurred overnight on December 6th into early Sunday, December 7th. Snow accumulations were generally between 12 and 20 inches across eastern and central Vermont, and between 18 and 30 inches in Champlain Valley and northern/central Mountains of Vermont. Meanwhile snow accumulations were generally between 12 and 20 inches across northern New York with numerous; mostly minor traffic accidents.

Click to enlarge
Figure 9-1 shows the 7 December 2003 surface analysis at 7 AM. Note the 992mb low pressure across the Gulf of Maine and the significant wrap around moisture over the North Country.

Several intense mesoscale snow bands moved across the region during this event, producing near zero visibilities and snowfall rates of 1 to 3 inches per hour.
Click to enlarge
Meanwhile, on 14 December 2003 a storm system organized along the coastal area of the Carolinas and provided the North Country with another significant snowfall. This system intensified and moved northeast to Cape Cod by early Monday, December 15th. The storm then moved into the Canadian Maritimes by Tuesday, December 16th. Snow developed Sunday afternoon, December 14th, and became heavy Sunday night into Monday morning, on December 15th. Snowfall amounts ranged from 10 to 30 inches across the region with isolated higher amounts across northern New York.

Figure 9-2 shows the 24 hour accumulated precipitation totals from 7 AM December 14th through 7 AM December 15th 2003. Many of the observation stations reported precipitation amounts associated with this very strong area of low pressure near 1.00".
Click to enlarge
Figure 9-3 shows the northeast composite radar reflectivity during on 15 December 2003 at 5 PM.
Click to enlarge
Meanwhile, Figure 9-4 shows the storm total snowfall for the 15 December 2003 winter storm. Click here for a list of snowfall reports across the region.


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Figure 9-1: Surface Analysis 7 December 2003 at 7 AM EST
Figure 9-2: 24 Hour Precipitation Totals from 7 AM December 14 through 7 AM December 15 2003
Figure 9-3: Northeast Composite Reflectivity 15 December 2003
Figure 9-4: Storm Total Snowfall 15 December 2003


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