Skip Navigation Linksweather.gov   
NOAA logo - Click to go to the NOAA homepage National Weather Service Forecast Office   NWS logo - Click to go to the NWS homepage
Columbia South Carolina
 



South Carolina Severe Weather Awareness Week

 

South Carolina will observe Severe Weather Awareness Week Feb. 28 to March 4, 2011.  This year, Severe Weather Awareness Week is sponsored by the National Weather Service, South Carolina Emergency Management Division, and the South Carolina Broadcasters Association. This annual event gives South Carolinians an opportunity to educate themselves or review their knowledge of severe weather hazards and safety rules.

With several deadly tornado events in Georgia and South Carolina during the past few years, it is imperative for everyone to have tornado safety procedures in place and to ensure they have a safe location to go to in the event of a tornado occurring.

The National Weather Service, South Carolina State Emergency Management Division, and South Carolina Broadcasters Association hope you will participate in the tornado drill. If it is not practical to actually exercise your plan at the designated date and time, the please take the time to think about where the safest shelter is and review your plan for efficiency.

 

2010 SEVERE WEATHER SEASON IN SOUTH CAROLINA

 

TORNADOES
2010 was a fairly normal year.  There were 25 tornadoes in the Palmetto State with no fatalities and abut a half dozen injuries.  Tornadoes are categorized by their strength according to the Enhanced Fujita Scale, ranging from EF0 (the weakest) to EF5 (the strongest). The wind speeds associated with each category are as follows:

EF0:  65  - 85 mph
EF1:  86  - 110 mph
EF2: 111 - 135 mph
EF3: 136 - 165 mph
EF4: 166 - 200 mph
EF5:       > 200 mph

Thirteen of the 2010 tornadoes were of EF0 strength, eight were EF1, and four were EF2.  There were no EF3, EF4, or EF5 tornadoes.

LIGHTNING
2010 was a very good year in terms of lightning impacts.  No one was killed and only a couple of people were injured.  Hopefully this can be attributed to enhanced awareness of lightning’s deadly potential by the National Weather Service, Emergency Management, Media, and others.

SEVERE THUNDERSTORMS
The year 2010 was a normal year for severe thunderstorms.  There were only a couple of  injuries from trees or large limbs falling on vehicles/structures or mobile homes being damaged.  No one was killed from wind or hail events.

 

2010 TORNADOES

Date Location
EF-Scale
Deaths

Injuries

Mar 28 McCormick Co.
1
0
0
Mar 28 Edgefield Co.
1
0
0
Mar 28 Edgefield Co.
2
0
0
Mar 28 Lexington Co. 
2
0
1
Mar 28             Fairfield Co.
0
0
0
Apr 08 Oconee Co.
0
0
0
Apr 08 Anderson Co. 
1
0
0
Apr 08 Beaufort Co.
0
0
0
Apr 25 Darlington Co.
2
0
3
Apr 25 Darlington Co.
2
0
0
Apr 25 Darlington Co.
1
0
0
May 03 Fairfield Co.
1
0
0
May 03 Fairfield Co.
0
0
0
May 03 Abbeville Co.
0
0
0
July 11 Lee Co.
0
0
0
July 11 Sumter Co.
0
0
0
July 12 Lancaster Co.
0
0
0
July 12 Lancaster Co.
0
0
0
July 12 Sumter Co.
1
0
0
Aug 06 Orangeburg Co.
0
0
0
Oct 26 Oconee Co.
0
0
0
Oct 26 Oconee Co.
0
0
1
Oct 26 Greenville Co.
0
0
0
Nov 30 Pickens Co. 
1
0
0
Nov 30 Laurens Co.
1
0
0

 

The National Weather Service encourages you to use the severe weather information in your broadcasts or printed articles. If more information is needed or if you would like to conduct interviews, have panel discussions, etc., contact the nearest National Weather Service office, the State Emergency Management office, or your local emergency management official.

 

 

 

Local Climate Water & Weather Topics:
Current Hazards, Current Conditions, Radar, Satellite, Hydrology, Climate, Office ProgramsWeather Safety, Contact Us

National Weather Service
Weather Forecast Office Columbia
2909 Aviation Way
 West Columbia, S.C. 29170-2102
(803)822-8135
Webmaster:
Page last modified:
Disclaimer Privacy Notice