Lessons Learned from Case 1


  • Based on climatology, upper low pressure tracking southeast out of the Great Lakes rarely produces widespread heavy snow in the Carolinas and Virginia (Albright and Cobb, 1996), unless it tracks through the Carolinas.

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  • The upper deformation zone, in combination with Atlantic moisture, produced the heavy snow in extreme eastern North Carolina (another case is documented in Albright and Cobb 1995).

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  • The west/east-oriented jet streaks within the southern semicircle of the upper low limited the low-level thermal and moisture advection, as no moisture from the Gulf of Mexico was entrained into the system.

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  • The limited low-level thermal and moisture advection resulted in more southeastward displacement of the area of heavy snow.

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  • The progressive northern stream upper ridge provided enhanced upper confluence in southeastern Canada, resulting in deeper cold advection and deep layer drying into Virginia.

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  • Evolution of the upper and surface ridges are often overlooked, and must be evaluated for consideration of low-level cooling and drying, which can significantly reduce snow amounts.

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