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Hurricane Francis was only a tropical depression when it impacted Virginia, North Carolina and Eastern Maryland. It brought scattered tornados to south central Viriginia. Click on the thumbnail graphics and look for updates to this page during the next 48 hours.

READ THE FULL METEOROLOGICAL ACCOUNT OF THE STORMS

SEE DAMAGE PHOTOS HERE

Caroline County Storm

 

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Note the storm in Caroline County.  There is a broad curvature to the reflectivity, but it is quite far from the radar, so the radar beam may be overshooting the strongest reflectivity signature.
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The storm eventually moved into the King George and Stafford County areas.  This storm produced a tornado from Bowling Green into northern Caroline County.

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Note the strong inbound and outbound velocities in the first 4 images.  The velocities decreased a little in the last 2 images, but the storm was moving away from the radar, and was already looking 7,000 Ft to 9,000 Ft into the storm, well above the tornadic winds.  Even though the radar was sampling the storm so high above the ground, the wind velocities were very impressive, similar to rotations we have seen from our colleagues in the Midwest U.S.  This storm produced a tornado from Bowling Green into northern Caroline County.

 

 

 

Nottoway, Amelia and Powhatan Storms

 

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Note the “C” shaped high reflectivity core in Amelia County.  This can be interpreted as a broad “hook” echo, and can indicate rotation.  The cell on the Amelia/Nottoway County border looks suspicious as well, but not as strong as the one in the middle of Amelia County.  A tornado occurred in Truxillo, in west central Amelia County.  In image 2, note the brighter green and red colors in the storms in central Amelia County.  The brighter the colors, the greater the wind speeds.  Green is toward to the radar and radar is away from the radar, so you can picture the counterclockwise spin the radar signature is implying. A tornado was reported in Truxillo in west central Amelia County.

 

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Note the “hook echo on the eastern border of Amelia and Nottoway Counties.  This storm was expected to track into western Chesterfield County, but did not produce any tornadoes.  In image 4, the rotation began to fall apart as it approached Powhatan County.  Note the red is much brighter than the green.  This suggests that the inflow into the storms from the east is much stronger than the outflow blowing from the west.  There were no tornadoes observed in Powhatan County.

 

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The “hook” echo in Powhatan County is not as well defined in this image as some of the past storms.  The storm near the Amelia/Chesterfield County border has a little bit of curvature to it.  Again, there were no tornadoes in Powhatan and Chesterfield Counties. In image 6, The rotations look relatively impressive, but a close look at the wind speed scale at the top, suggests the wind speeds were not strong enough to support tornadoes.

 

 

 

Chesterfield Storms

 

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The cell in western Chesterfield County doesn’t have much of a curvature or “hook” echo.  The rotation in image 2 suggests the inflow from the east (red colors) was a bit stronger than the outflow westerly winds (green colors).  No tornadoes were reported in western Chesterfield County, but as it tracked into the eastern border of Richmond and Henrico County, it produced a brief weak tornado.

                         

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The cell in south central Chesterfield County has a little bit of curvature to it, but again, not a convincing “hook” echo.  The rotation in image 2, again, is relatively weak, but shows somewhat even inbound and outbound velocities.  There were no tornadoes reported on Chesterfield County, but as it tracked into the eastern border of Richmond and Henrico County, it produced a brief weak tornado.