Maine-Ly Weather

 

Spring/Summer 2004

Editor Sonia Mark

 

Welcome to the 2004 Spring/Summer edition of Maine-Ly Weather! I’m your new editor Sonia Mark, a meteorologist here at the National Weather Service in Caribou, Maine. I will be attempting to fill the very large shoes of departing newsletter editor, Hendricus Lulofs, our Warning Coordination Meteorologist (WCM).  Hendricus is leaving us for a promotion in Blacksburg, Virginia. His exit is a loss to our office and he will be greatly missed. We all wish him well and hope he will come back and visit “The County” soon!

 

In this edition of Maine-Ly Weather you will find several articles written by our staff on a wide variety of topics.  In addition, one of our CO-OP Observers, Bill Larrabee of Sebec Lake, made an article contribution. We encourage all our weather observers to contribute, as well as our weather spotters, and even fellow weather-fanatics!

 

What’s more, I would like to welcome our new Warning Coordination Meteorologist, Mr. Anthony Sturey. Tony comes to us from the Louisville, Kentucky weather service office. We are very excited for his arrival in late May. In the spirit to get to know our new WCM, we asked him to tell us a little about himself in an article for Maine-Ly Weather!

 

I really hope you enjoy this edition of Maine-Ly Weather. To read the articles that follow just click where indicated. And please have a wonderful and safe summer season!

 

 

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Comings and Goings...

 

By Hendricus Lulofs, WCM

 

Text Box: I would like to let the many weather spotters that I have met over the years know that I have accepted a promotion that has required me to move to Blacksburg, VA.  I appreciate the many weather spotters who have contributed valuable reports during my tenure.  Soon a new Warning Coordination Meteorologist will take over my role at the Caribou office.

 

 

 

       Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Meet Our New WCM!

 

By Anthony Sturey

Warning Coordination Meteorologist

 

Text Box: My name is Tony Sturey.  I was recently selected as the Warning Coordination Meteorologist (WCM) at the Caribou, Maine National Weather Service (NWS) Office. My family and I are moving from Louisville Kentucky, to the Caribou area, in mid May. We are very excited about our new job assignment, as well as participating in new adventures and enjoying the quality of life in Maine.

 

 

       Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One Weather Observer's Story

 

By Bill Larrabee

CO-OP Observer

 

Text Box: It all began for me when I was enrolled in a course for commercial pilots at the end of World War II. Meteorology was one of the requisite subjects and it soon became my favourite. Later, while flying in the Syracuse, New York area I became friends with the U.S. Bureau Chief who asked if I would be interested in taking daily observations at my home located just off the lee of Lake Ontario.

 

 

       Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Drought of 1999-2002

 

By Mark Turner

      Service Hydrologist

 

Text Box: So how bad was the drought? Of course depending on whom you talk to, what element of drought you are talking about, or where you live, the drought had varying effects on the people of Maine.

 

 

         Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

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Winter Climate Summary for Northern and Downeast Maine                                                                 

 

By Victor J. Nouhan

Climate Focal Point

     

 

Text Box: Overall...northern and eastern Maine experienced slightly below to below average temperatures, below average liquid equivalent precipitation, and near average to slightly above average snowfall during the core of this past winter (December through February).

 

     Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

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The Mysteries & Challenges of Forecasting Weather

 

By Mark Bloomer

Forecaster

 

Text Box: The morning is bright and sunny with blue sky stretching from horizon to horizon.  
Nothing can be seen in the vast expanse of sky except for a few lonely contrails 
and a couple wisps of high cirrus clouds. The air is calm, and the only sounds that 
can be heard outdoors are the morning birds and a few passing cars.

 

 

     Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

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Air Quality Forecasting

       

By Timothy Duda and Joseph Hewitt

Air Quality Forecasting Team

Text Box: The quality of the air we breathe can have significant health impacts on our population. This is especially true for young children and those with pre-existing respiratory conditions.  The ozone layer found naturally at stratospheric heights, protects us from the harmful effects of the sun’s ultraviolet rays, however, when ozone forms near the ground it can have a harmful effect on humans.

 

 

 

     Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Wind Instrumentation on Weather Bouys Fail

 

By Anthony Mignone

Marine Focal Point

 

Text Box: On January 17th, 2004 the anemometer and wind direction indicator on the Jonesport Buoy, located 20 miles south of Jonesport, failed. A short time later, on February 4th, the wind equipment located on Mount Desert Rock also failed.

 

       Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

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EchoLink-Another Mode of Communication for Amateurs

 

By Michael Fitzsimmons

Senior Forecaster

 

Text Box: Amateur radio operators have been enjoying two-way communications (QSOs) via ionospheric propagation for many decades. This mode of operation has had an enjoyable side to it, in that individuals from five miles to five thousand miles away have been able to share a common interest, the art of communicating, resulting in friendships made without ever meeting the other person.

 

 

       Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

  

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Convective Season brings Renewed Hazard for Amateurs

 

   By Michael Fitzsimmons

Senior Forecaster

 

Text Box: As we wind down another winter season with the last of the snow and river ice to melt, we look forward to a summer season that offers longer, warmer and increasingly humid days. As the Polar and Arctic jets interact with the northward transition of the Subtropical jet during the spring and summer season, the environ-mental ingredients of increased moisture, instability and lift sets the stage for another convective season across the country.

 

 

 

 

  Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

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Thunderstorm Season in Northern and Eastern Maine 

 

By Joseph Hewitt

Senior Forecaster

 

Text Box: We are quickly approaching the time of year when thunderstorms become more prevalent in the Northeastern United States; especially from late spring through mid-summer. Some thunderstorm activity can become severe in the New England states.

 

 Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

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General Interest 

 

 

WFO Caribou Staff

 

 

Text Box: This section of our newsletter contains articles of general interest, as well as fun games and puzzles. Check back to see what we’ve added as we will be updating!

 

 Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

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