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Winter Scene Leaves falling on Pumpkin

NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
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Maine-ly Weather

Volume 6
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Fall / Winter
2002-2003

Welcome to the Fall/Winter edition of Maine-ly Weather.  In this issue, we will take a look at some statistics from the drought that has been affecting portions of the U.S. including how we stand in  northern Maine.
The NWS is changing how we prepare and deliver our forecasts to the general public, so we will feature a special section on using our experimental graphical forecasts that are available now on the Internet.
As winter approaches, the wonderful people who participate in our Cooperative Observer Program will be getting ready to

measure snow again.  We have a reminder for the How's, When's, and Where's of measuring snowfall, and melting frozen precip for water equivalent reports.
Winter recreation is a must for northern Maine.  We will show you how you can use our forecast products to take the best advantage of planning for your favorite outdoor activity.
For those of our customers that do not have access to a  computer, or to the Internet, we urge you to visit your local library where you can visit our Internet site and fully appreciate the wonderful opportunities

offered online.
NOAA Weather Radio continues to change and expand.  We are happy to bring you an update on where we stand with the new transmitter sites, and the voice improvement. 
As always, we appreciate your comments and suggestions.

Editor: Bonnie Terrizzi

Inside this issue:
 

Update on National Weather Service   
NOAA Weather Radio


Milo, Station KHB-54, broadcasting on a frequency of 162.450 MHz was the first new transmitter to come on line.    This transmitter serves the areas of the Central Maine Highlands, including the areas near Millinocket, Lincoln, Dover-Foxcroft and southern portion of Baxter State Park

Since the last issue of Maine-ly Weather, two new NOAA Weather Radios have begun broadcasting in a test mode.  Although they will remain in a test mode for some time longer, they are fully functional, carrying a full broadcast load, and with a full warning program when hazardous weather threatens the area.   

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