Maine-Ly WeatherFall – Winter 2003-04

 

Introduction

By Hendricus Lulofs

Warning Coordination Meteorologist

 

Welcome to another edition of Maine-Ly Weather.  As another summer has come to an end, we now once again look ahead to winter.  But before we do, I would like to thank our more than 450 weather spotters throughout the region for their many reports.  As we head into snow season, I am sure we will be hearing more from you!

 

 In this edition of Maine-Ly weather you will find several articles written by our staff on a wide variety of topics.  In addition I want to welcome a new contributor to our newsletter, Stan G Kain.  Stan is one of our new weather spotters who also is a journalist by trade. Stan has written 2 articles for this issue and he will hopefully continue to contribute in the future.

 

Below you will find brief excerpts from this issues stories.  To read the entire article, just click where indicated.     

 

 

 

Why We Become Weather Spotters

Text Box: Why do people choose to become weather spotters?  There are probably as many reasons, as there are weather spotters.  Whether spotters have volunteered out of a sense of duty to their community, because of an interest in meteorology, or because of some experience in their lives, weather spotters all have a story to tell.  As a spotter, I'd like to tell you about the experiences which led me to weather spotting.  by Stan G. Kain

 

 

 

 

Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------

 

Improvements to Experimental
Forecast Images

By Mark Reschke

ITO National Weather Service Caribou

 

Text Box: Our Experimental Forecast Images changed in August, 2003. These images are a set of map-based graphics that show the various elements of our weather forecast. They are experimental because their evaluation period ends December 31, 2003. Some maps show temperature for the next 7 days. Others depict the chance of precipitation. 16 elements of our forecast are displayed in this way.

 

 

Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

Can You Make a Difference Fighting Global Warming?

                                         

By: Sonia E Mark

Meteorologist Intern

 

Text Box:      There are still many debates today as to whether global warming is
a real threat. It seems scientists can never agree if we are in fact in
a period of global warming, or maybe even the lesser known global
cooling.

 

Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

-------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

 

NOAA Weather Radio In
Northern New England

By Hendricus Lulofs & John Jensenius

Warning Coordination Meteorologists NWS Caribou & Gray, Maine

 

Text Box: Warning Coordination Meteorologists at NWS Caribou & Gray, Maine recently put together a new NOAA weather Radio brochure.  This brochure explains the use of NOAA weather radio and lists all of the NOAA weather radio location and broadcast frequencies in Northern New England.  Many new sites have recently come online allowing over 95% of the population of the region to be able to receive NOAA Weather Radio.

 

 

 

Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

2003 Summer Climate Summary For Northern And Downeast Maine                                                                 

 

By Victor J. Nouhan

WFO Climate Focal Point

 

Text Box: Contrasting rainfall distribution across the region was the primary focal point for the summer of 2003. Locations across the western mountains and north generally received above normal  
rainfall while locations Downeast generally received below normal rainfall.

 

 

Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------

 

Fire Weather forecasting in Maine

Mark Bloomer

Fire Weather Focal Point

 

Text Box: National Weather Service offices nationwide participate in a specialized branch of forecasting known as “Fire Weather”.  A fire weather forecast is a forecast specifically tailored to outline weather conditions that effect wildfires.  These include the potential for a fire to start, for a fire to grow and spread, and for the smoke produced by a fire to disperse through the atmosphere.

    

 

 

Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

Safe Winter Travel

By Stan G. Kain

 

Text Box: Watching the changing colors of fall foliage, I'm reminded that winter isn't far away.  Living in Maine, winter storms are part of our daily lives.  I'm reminded that the Red Cross classifies winter storms as, “deceptive killers.”  According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, about seventy percent of automobile accidents, resulting in death, are ice-or-snow related.

 

 

 

Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

Flash Flood  Monitoring  Prediction  System at the National Weather Service

By: Joseph Hewitt

Senior Forecaster

 

Text Box: The National Weather Service has developed a new monitoring system that will help forecasters with early detection of flash flooding. This new system is called the Flash Flood Monitoring and Prediction system or otherwise known as FFMP. This new Flash Flood Monitoring and Prediction system was used as a forecast and warning tool for the first time this year 2003 at the National Weather Service in Caribou.

 

 

 

Click HERE to read more… 

 

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

 

 

Water, Water, Everywhere…

Mark Turner, Service Hydrologist

 

 

 

Text Box: Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink. That familiar stanza from Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “The Ancient Mariner” seems apt to describe the state of the water supply here in Northern Maine over the past water year.

 

 

Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

AMATEUR RADIO PROVIDES ASSISTANCE
DURING HURRICANE ISABEL

 

By Michael Fitzsimmons

 

 

Text Box: When Hurricane Isabel hit the east coast recently, amateur radio operators from Florida to the mid-Atlantic states stepped up to provide much-welcome assistance during this major event.  Amateur Radio volunteers had been keeping an eye on the storm for several days prior to its arrival and they were ready to assist in providing communication support and weather spotting.

 

 

Click HERE to read more…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

 

 

SKYWARN Recognition Day 2003

By Michael Fitzsimmons

 

 

Text Box: The fifth annual SKYWARN Recognition Day (SRD) will take place on December 6th from 0000 UTC to 2400 UTC (1900 EST December 5 to 1900 EST December 6). This day provides Amateur Radio operators an opportunity to visit National Weather Service (NWS) offices and work to make contact with other NWS offices and operators around the world.

 

 

Click HERE to read more…