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July 27, 1994

Mid-Atlantic Tornado Outbreak

Preliminary report prepared for NWS Eastern Region

by Barbara McNaught Watson

Summary of Events occurring across the WSFO LWX Forecast Area

Overview:

On July 27, 1994 between 3:00 pm and 11:00 pm, 21 tornadoes touched down in Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware. Fourteen of the tornadoes occurred in Maryland setting a new record for the day and the year. The previous record was 13 tornadoes in 1992. Tornado strengths ranged from F0 to F2 and path lengths ranged from 1/2 mile to 15 miles (non-continuous damage). The longest continuous damage path was 6 miles. No deaths occurred in the three states. No injuries occurred in Virginia, one injury in Maryland, and three injuries occurred in Delaware. Media coverage of the tornadoes in Maryland was excellent and injuries, perhaps even loss of life, was averted by people taking the appropriate action.

Tornado outbreaks during the summer months are considered rare in the Mid-Atlantic Region from a historical perspective, yet they have now occurred three years in a row. August 1992 saw 11 weak tornadoes spawned by the remnant of Hurricane Andrew as it passed across Maryland; in August 1993, southeast Virginia saw 18 tornadoes including the F4 that struck Petersburg; and now in 1994, a late July outbreak spawned 21 tornadoes. All three cases had a commonality that differs from the typical Midwest outbreak. The tornadoes were spawned by low-top thunder-storms (less than 35,000 feet) and often had reflectivity levels below 50 dBZ.

Detection and warning of these storms using conventional radar is extremely difficult if not impossible. The WSR-88D has been successful at detecting the storm rotation and tornadic signatures if they are inside the velocity range-fold area (see attachment 2). However, the Petersburg tornado was not detected from the Sterling radar, some 100 nm away, due to range folding and lack of a strong reflectivity signature. Because these are low-top thunderstorms, usually, the mesocyclone is not as deep and often the velocity couplet signature is not as pronounced as in storms seen in the Midwest.

Below is a summary of how the damage survey was conducted and an overview of WSFO LWX operations during the event including use of the WSR-88D. Specific tornado descriptions are provided in Table 1 (Attachment 1) which lists the severe storm events across Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware, chronologically, by the thunderstorm producing them and indicates whether or not warnings were in effect. Attachment 3 is a general overview map of the tornado tracks. Table 2 (Attachment 4) lists all the NWS products issued within WSFO LWX forecast area covering the storms. Attachment 5 is copies of the original watch, warnings, and statements issued.

Conducting the Damage Survey:

The damage survey in central Virginia was conducted by Central Wills and staff at WSO RIC. In Spotsylvania and Stafford Counties, Virginia, and in Charles, Prince Georges, and Calvert Counties, Maryland, the survey was conducted by Barbara McNaught Watson, WCM at WSFO LWX. In Anne Arundel, Queen Annes, Kent, Cecil, and Harford counties, Maryland, Fred Davis, MIC of WSO BWI, conducted the survey. On Aberdeen Proving Grounds, the survey was done by Charles Clough, MIC of the Meteorological Division, and his staff (phone # 410-278-2840). The damage survey in Delaware was conducted by Marion Peleski, ex-MIC of WSO ILG and now working for the Delaware Emergency Management Agency. An aerial survey was also done, lead by Michael Thomlinson of Aviation Services (OM13) with co-pilot Dan Gudgel. Barbara McNaught Watson, WCM WSFO LWX, and Jim Eberwine, Lead Forecaster WSFO DIX assisted in the aerial survey.

Preliminary report times used in the LSRs were based on the time that a report was relayed into the office. These times were made more precise using WSR-88D archive data of the event to pinpoint the storm over a damage site. However, when viewing the archive data from the Sterling WSR-88D, we realized that the clock was 7 minutes slow and, hence, all times were advanced seven minutes. (WSFO LWX only had use of the radar for 4 hours when the outbreak began. Discussion of this can be found in the WSFO LWX operations section.)

It was often difficult to decide whether to link damage tracks as one tornado that was weakening and strengthening or to consider it as two distinct tornadoes. For instance, no damage was seen by ground or aerial survey between Andrews Air Force Base and the Kettering touchdown sites and yet, there were eyewitness sightings of funnel clouds. However, this could have been the tornado in its final rope stage as the storm was generating a new tornado. Hence, in this case, it was counted as two tornadoes.

WSFO LWX Operations:

Around noon on July 27, Unisys and JSPO turned over operation of the WSR-88D to WSFO LWX having completed implementation of the system 6.0 software and VME hardware upgrade. At this point the radar was fully functional, but lacking all adaptable parameters unique to KLWX. This included the RPS lists, color schemes, map backgrounds/overlays, user functions, alert areas and thresholds, user passwords, and the generation and distribution list. Jim Weismueller, who was assigned to work a radar shift that afternoon and evening, and Barbara McNaught Watson, spent four hours restoring most of these parameters. By 4 O'clock, all was updated except the user functions and the generation and distribution list which would have allowed access by non-associated and NIDS users.

A little past 400 pm, Jim Weismueller received a phone call from WSO RIC indicating that a funnel was reported in Goochland County, Virginia. He began interrogating the storm. Jim stayed in touch with WSO RIC. As the storm moved across Louisa County toward our CWA, it was strengthening from a weak mesocyclone toward a moderate one. Andy Stern had been the lead forecaster on the public day shift. He stayed on through the evening to assist Jim. Jim and Andy issued a very strongly worded statement at 440 pm as the storm approached Spotsylvania County and even indicated that the storm could potentially spawn a tornado. A warning was not issued at this point, since they could get no confirmation of severe weather from the storm as it past over Louisa County.

At 520 pm, a severe thunderstorm warning was issued for eastern Spotsylvania County, the City of Fredericksburg, Stafford and King George Counties. Again, this was strongly worded and indicated the possibility of the storm spawning a tornado.

Often, the choice between a severe thunderstorm warning and a tornado warning is not an easy one. Tornado warnings mean that a tornado is sighted or strongly indicated by radar. They didn't have that, so a severe thunderstorm warning was warranted. About 50% of mesocyclones produce tornadoes and so there strong wording was definitely warranted.

As the mesocyclone moved across Spotsylvania County, it continued to intensify. The first tornado to touch down in the LWX CWA was at about 540 pm over northeast Spotsylvania County just southeast of the City of Fredericksburg. It was an F1 tornado which travelled about three miles into Stafford County where it continued another mile and a half as an F0. This tornado was not reported until later.

At 600 pm, police in Stafford County reported sighting a tornado near the town of Hartwood in western Stafford. This tornado was short-lived and only an F0. From replay of WSR-88D data we estimate this around 547 pm, but there was no strong signature. At 602 pm, a tornado warning was issued for Stafford County, Virginia, Charles County, Maryland and the adjacent waters of the Tidal Potomac. As the forecasters were preparing this warning, SELS called from NSSFC to indicate that they were going to issue a Severe Thunderstorm Watch. The forecasters told SELS that they were in the process of issuing tornado warnings and that the VAD wind profile on the WSR-88D showed a strong helicity pattern. After some consideration, SELS called back indicating that they had decided to keep it a severe thunderstorm watch. The watch was issued at 620 pm.

At 635 pm, the Charles County EOC called reporting that the fire rescue station in Ironside was damaged by a tornado. The tornado was sighted as it passed by the Fire Station. Andy sent a severe weather statement at 637 pm to update people on the storm position and movement. Jim sent a second tornado warning for Charles County which went out at 638 pm. EBS was activated for these warnings.

At 710 pm, a tornado warning was issued for southern Prince Georges County. A stream of severe weather statements followed to update people on the position of the storm as reports of sighting and damage began flowing into the office. The first statement used the new WSR-88D 6.0 software enhanced road maps to pinpoint the tornado's likely location and movement indicating that it was only five miles southwest of Andrews Air Force Base. Within minutes, amateur radio reports confirmed that a tornado was indeed on the ground in the Clinton area. At 735 pm, another tornado warning was issued for central and northern Prince Georges County.

While the primary mesocyclone moved northeast, a second mesocyclone developed southwest of La Plata in Charles County, Maryland. It was at this point that forecasters realized that they had an outbreak developing. A tornado warning was issued at 745 pm for a possible tornado just east of La Plata. Soon, they were tracking three different tornadic mesocyclones (see attachment 2). In addition to the storms spawning tornadoes, reports of flooding began flowing into the office. Some areas received four to five inches of rain. The forecasters had their hands full at this point. The possibility of flooding had been emphasized earlier in the day, but at this point, the were focused on the tornado threat.

As the storms crossed southern Maryland, the storm relative maps (SRMs) clearly depicted the tornadic storms and were of great assistance. However, as the storms turned more north as they moved across the bay into northern Maryland, the SRMs became less useful. The thunderstorms were being pulled toward the comma head of the storm system and the mean storm movement used by the SRMs. It was back to relying on the base velocity signatures. The mesocyclones did not appear as intense as they approached northeast Maryland, and attention was focused back on flood problems with flash flood warnings being issued for both Harford and Cecil counties. A weak tornado in Harford county showed little signature on the WSR-88D and was spawned by a thunderstorm in the storm systems comma head. A tornado warning was issued which verified as another storm spawned a weak tornado across Aberdeen Proving Grounds.

Word of the Delaware tornadoes did not reach WSO ILG until about two hours after they occurred. At the time that they were occurring, our forecasters were focused on tracking two tornadoes across a heavily populated Prince Georges county and Charles County. On base reflectivity at 0.5 degrees, the Delaware storms appear as small thunderstorms less than 50 dBZ. On base velocity, they are well within the range-fold area. The small tornadoes occurred in the same county as the Dover WSR-88D (KDOX), however, this was no time for Sterling to be dialing into Dover. Unfortunately, Mount Holly WSR-88D (KDIX) PUP was down and so they too were unable to monitor the storms.

As the storms progressed from Maryland into Chester County, Pennsylvania, Sterling assisted Mount Holly by dialing into both KDIX and KDOX. Sterling advised Mount Holly on the issuance of both the Chester and Montgomery County tornado warnings. Reviewing the archive data shows that KDOX had the best angle on the storms showing stronger rotational velocities than KDIX. However, none of the radars seem to catch a signature for the first tornado in Chester County. The mesocyclone became more distinct as it approached Downingtown and hence, the decision to warn.

Table 1: Severe Weather Events for July 27

Mesocyclone #1 -

300 pm TSTM Winds Buckingham County, Virginia

Limited damage occurred along route 610 near route 718. Trees were broken off and a few uprooted. Occasional damage of trees occurred as the storm moved northeast in the vicinity of route 610 into Cumberland County.

No warning in effect.

325 pm Tornado (F1) Cumberland County, Virginia

Path length = .75 miles Path width = 200 yds

Extensive tree damage occurred along route 690. Tornado touched down just prior to crossing the James River near the town of Columbia.

No warning in effect.

350 pm Tornado (F1) Goochland County, Virginia

Path Length = 1 mile Path width = 100-125 yds

Part of a tin roof was blown off a firehouse. Windows were blown out of some parked cars and a billboard sign was damaged. Trees were uprooted and snapped. The tornado funnel was sighted.

No warning in effect.

533-543 pm Tornado (F1) Spotsylvania and Stafford Counties, Virginia.

Path length = 4.5 miles Path width = 150 yds (max)

Tornado touched down about five miles south of Fredericksburg. F1 damage was observed over the first couple miles of the track to the northeast. The tornado weakened to an F0 and continued into Stafford County. Most of damage was in Spotsylvania. A chimney collapsed into home and a shed torn off foundation. Minor damage was observed to other homes. A wall flexed on an industrial building, partially collapsing an inside ceiling. Hundreds of trees uprooted and snapped.

Severe Thunderstorm Warning was issued at 521 pm valid until 615 pm - warning was strongly worded, mentioning the threat of tornadoes.

547 pm Tornado (F0) Stafford County, Virginia

Path length = .5 miles Path width = 75 yds (max)

Tornado damaged some trees and power lines near the town of Hartwood.

Severe Thunderstorm Warning was issued at 521 pm valid until 615 pm - warning was strongly worded, mentioning the threat of tornadoes.

635 pm Tornado (F2) Charles County, Maryland

Path length = .75 miles Path width = 200 yds (max)

Tornado uprooted or stripped every tree in its path and demolished several outbuildings. Two homes in its path only sustained minor damage due to the heavy protection from surrounding trees (of which none were left). Strong inflow was also evident. Tornado was rated at the lower end of an F2.

Tornado Warning was issued at 603 pm valid until 630 pm. Warning was reissued at 638 valid until 715 pm.

715-727 pm Tornado (F1) Prince Georges County, Maryland

Path length = 6 miles Path width = 150 yds (max)

Tornado touched down about 5 miles southwest of Andrews Air Force Base. This tornado was spawned from the same storm that struck Charles County and touched down tornadoes in Virginia. The tornado moved northeast toward Andrews crossing many subdivisions in the Clinton area. Many trees were uprooted and snapped. Most of the damage to homes were from trees falling on houses. Some homes sustained damage to their roofs such as missing shingles, broken antennas, chimney tops, or some damage to eaves.

Tornado Warning was issued at 710 pm valid until 745 pm.

742-754 pm Tornado (F1) Prince Georges County, Maryland

Path length = 6 miles Path width = 100 yds (max)

Tornado touched down about 5 miles southwest of Bowie. It took part of a roof of a home, moved through a wooded park area and into the subdivision of Kettering. Here it caused mostly minor roof damage to a number of homes and uprooted and snapped trees. The most significant damage was to the side of a home were some sort of a projectile punched a hole through the siding into the attic. However, there did not appear to be any plywood or significant backing to the siding to help prevent the penetration.

The tornado continued across Route 214 where a tree fell on a car injuring the driver (this is the only known injury in Maryland). It moved through the Wild World Theme Park toppling many trees but only causing minor damage to the rides and buildings. The tornado weakened to F0 causing scattered damage into Bowie. The dissipating rope funnel was sighted as the storm moved across Route 3 and Route 50. Maximum strength reached the upper end of an F1.

Tornado Warning was issued at 737 pm valid until 815 pm.

820 pm Tornado (F0) Anne Arundel County, Maryland

Path Length = 5 miles Path width = 100 yds

A tornado touched down in the Crofton area causing mainly tree damage. Spotty damage continued to near the Crownsville area.

Tornado Warning was issued at 815 pm valid until 845 pm.

840 pm Tornado (F2) Anne Arundel County, Maryland

Path length = 7 miles Path width = 200 yds

About 4 miles northeast of the Crownsville site damage began again near Benfield Village. A car was overturned. A roof was damaged to a large Safeway in Arnold and tree damage occurred through Lake Waterford Park in Pasadena. The tornado strengthened as it approached Riviera Beach which is about 10 miles southeast of the center of downtown Baltimore. Roof fans were stripped off a business and flung into cars, twisted and deposited in a nearby field. A couple large outer doors to the business were destroyed and inner walls were blown out. At a second business, considerable damage occurred to vehicles. One camper truck was thrown 100 feet and another was turned over three times. A wall collapsed in the building.

Tornado Warning was issued at 815 pm valid until 845 pm.

Mesocyclone #2 - Developed south of the first one and moved more easterly.

744-746 pm Tornado (F2) Charles County, Maryland

Path length = .75 miles Path width = 150-200 yds

Tornado touched down about 2 miles southeast of La Plata and moved through the Clarks Run II subdivision damaging many homes. Windows were blown out, portions of roofs off, carports torn off, chimneys collapsed, siding off and trees uprooted, snapped, and stripped. There were clear signs of circular rotation. On the left side of the tornado, a piece of aluminum was stripped off of one house and hurled upstream into the wall of a neighboring house on the periphery of the storm. The metal strip was drive 18 inches inside the house with about 3 feet still dangling outside. Tornado was rated at the lower end of an F2.

Tornado Warning was issued at 746 pm valid until 815 pm.

756-759 pm Tornado (F0) Charles County, Maryland

Path length = 1.5 miles Path width = 75 yds

Same storm that hit La Plata spawned a second weak tornado about 5 miles to the east. Trees were snapped along a clearly defined path. No obvious damage to homes. Tornado moved across Olivers shop road and Route 5 within a mile south and east of Bryantown.

Tornado Warning was issued at 746 pm valid until 815 pm.

821-827 pm Tornado (F1) Calvert County, Maryland

Path length = 3 miles Path width = 120 yds (max)

Tornado touched down about 5 miles southwest of Chesapeake Beach. It crossed Lower Marlboro Road damaging trees, a tin roof, and a garage. It moved northeast toward Route 4 and Lord Baltimore Road where it caused damage to roofs on a few homes and torn a barn off its foundation depositing it onto Route 4. Many trees were uprooted and snapped. The tornado crossed Route 4 destroying another barn, uprooting and snapping trees, and causing some damage to a couple more roofs. The tornado dissipated as it reached Route 2 a couple miles south of Owings.

Tornado Warning was issued at 815 pm valid until 845 pm.

857-859 pm Tornado (F1) Queen Annes County, Maryland

Path length = 1.5 mile Path width = 100 yds

Tornado moved ashore from the Chesapeake Bay onto the southern portion of Kent Island. Many homes experienced roof damage and trees were uprooted. Damage was at the upper end of an F1. Damaged estimated near 1/2 million.

Special Marine Warning was issued at 850 pm for the entire Chesapeake Bay north of the mouth of the Potomac River - Warning mentioned tornadoes and Kent Island is surrounded by the bay. No warning for Queen Annes County.

Mesocyclone #3 - Developed to the southwest of #2 and moved more easterly.

803 pm Tornado (F0) Charles County

Path Length = .25 miles Path width = 50 yds.

Small tornado was sighted moving inland from the Potomac River north of the Route 301 bridge. A restaurant along Popes Creek Road, on the Potomac water front, had its porch torn off and some other minor damage.

Tornado Warning issued 746 pm valid until 815 pm.

851 pm TSTM winds Calvert County

Winds estimated at 50 to 60 mph moved through the town of North Beach. Numerous tree limbs were broken, but no path was found.

Mesocyclone #4 - Developed north of meso #2 and south of meso #1 (short-lived)

910-920 pm Tornado (F2) Kent County

Path length = 4 miles Path width = 150 yds

Tornado damage varied between F0 to a lower F2 along its path which began in Butlertown and moved northwest toward Rocky Point. An abandoned house was bowed out in front and the chimney was knocked down. A garage was lifted off its foundation. A tool shed was demolished and a ladder from the shed was thrown through a window. Another shed was collapsed. Windows were blown out. Water in toilets was gone. A truck was picked up and moved 30 ft. A 35 ft pirate replica ship weighing 1.5 tons was moved out of a pond and broken up 25 ft onshore. A large tree was lifted completely out of the ground and thrown 150 ft. Many other trees were uprooted or snapped. Damage estimated 500,000 to 700,000 dollars.

Tornado Warning was issued at 903 valid until 930 pm.

Mesocyclone #5 - Developed over Kent County and eventually did the damage in PA

945 pm Tornado (F1) Cecil County, Maryland

Path length = 15 miles Path width = 100 yds

A house was blown off its foundation about 10 ft and a 30 ft camper was deposited about 25 ft into the Sassafras River which borders Kent and Cecil Counties. Damage became spotty after the first mile with gaps of 1 to 2 miles in between. It is uncertain if tornado had lifted or just weakened to an F0 and damage was not notable. The path continued to the northeast across the county roughly paralleling the Elk River. Most of the damage was to trees which were sheared off and uprooted. Damage is estimated at 600,000 dollars.

No severe thunderstorm or tornado warnings issued. Flash Flood warning was in effect for the storm.

Mesocyclone #6 - Comma head of the whole developing storm system

948 pm Tornado (F0) Harford County

Path length = .5 miles Path width = 75 yds

Tornado touched down near route 95 and the Baltimore-Howard County line. Many trees and several homes received minor damage.

No warnings in effect for Hartford County.

Mesocyclone #7 - Developed over bay southeast of Meso #6

1002-1007 pm Tornado (F1) Harford County

Path length = 2.5 miles Path width = 30 yds

A tornado hit Aberdeen Proving Ground at 1003 pm. Damage to one building included garage doors buckling, a door being sucked in as a 15 to 20 ft section of roof was lifted off, a 30 wall section of the building was pushed out with some corrugated aluminum twisted off one end, and another 50 foot section of roof was lifted up. At another building had minor damage. Near these buildings, a heavy truck trailer was moved 15 ft. A 150 lb steel container was moved 50 yards and other lighter objects were tossed around. The tornado moved across water then on a thin peninsula of land, some trees were snapped before it moved out over the Bay.

Tornado Warning was issued at 1001 pm valid until 1030 pm.

In a separate line of thunderstorms over Delaware (not associated with thunderstorm system mentioned above), three tornadoes and some straight-line wind damage occurred. These tornadoes are documented below: (times approximated)

735 pm Tornado (F0) Kent County, Delaware

Path length = .25 miles Path width = 50 yds

A couple miles southwest of Farmington, a small weak tornado moved a single floor home off its foundation by 20 ft. The roof was removed and blown into a corn field. Four people inside crowded into a bathroom and sustained minor injuries from broken glass. The tornado was spotted by neighbors moving across the cornfield behind the house where it dissipated. The house was not secured to the foundation nor was the roof to the walls. A dog house, satellite dish, and pick-up truck were also damaged.

No warnings in effect.

740 pm Tornado (F1) Kent County, Delaware

Path length = 1.5 miles Path width = 100 yds

A tornado touched down on route 14 just west of Harrington causing some minor tree damage and damage to a television antenna and some siding. About a mile to the northeast it Strengthened and struck a middle school which lost a large section of the cafeteria roof. The tornado's funnel cloud was sighted by people attending the Delaware State Fair just to the southeast of the storm.

No warnings in effect.

745 pm Tornado (F0) Kent County, Delaware

Path length = .25 miles Path width = 50 yds

A small weak tornado touched down about 4 miles northwest of Harrington. Three chicken coops were damaged and a trailer was rolled over. The owners residence was untouched. Debris was scattered across a nearby field.

No warnings in effect.

750 pm TSTM Winds Kent County, Delaware

Two sites along Route 13 had some wind damage. One was about 2 miles south of Felton where a warehouse lost its loading doors and sustained damage to some other doors. An empty trailer was blown off a rig which was driving south on Route 13. The second site was just west of Route 13 north of Felton where a mobile home was moved from its foundation (no tie-down) and damaged. Winds are estimated between 50 and 70 mph.

No warnings in effect.

Table 2: Warnings, Watches and Statements for July 27

(Initial time equals AFOS transmit time converted to EDT)

Issued/valid 'til

422 pm / 445 pm Special Weather Statement issued by RIC

For Louisa County, Virginia

443 pm / 700 pm Special Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Spotsylvania County, Virginia

521 pm / 615 pm Severe Thunderstorm Warning issued by LWX

For King George, Stafford, Spotsylvania, Fredericksburg (VA)

603 pm / 630 pm Tornado Warning issued by LWX

For Stafford County (VA) and Charles County (MD)

619 pm /1100 pm Severe Thunderstorm Watch issued by NSSFC

For DE, central/ern MD, DC, Ern VA, SE PA, and srn NJ

637 pm / 700 pm Severe Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Charles County, Maryland

638 pm / 715 pm Tornado Warning issued by LWX

For Charles County, Maryland

710 pm / 745 pm Tornado Warning issued by LWX

For Southern Prince Georges County, Maryland

717 pm / 900 pm Severe Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Prince Georges and Charles Counties

721 pm / 900 pm Severe Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Prince Georges County

724 pm /1000 pm Severe Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Prince Georges County

729 pm /1000 pm Severe Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Prince Georges County

737 pm / 815 pm Tornado Warning issued by LWX

For Central and Northern Prince Georges County

745 pm /1000 pm Severe Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Prince Georges County

746 pm / 815 pm Tornado Warning issued by LWX

For northeastern Charles County

750 pm /1000 pm Severe Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Prince Georges and Charles Counties

815 pm / 845 pm Tornado Warning issued by LWX

For Anne Arundel and Northern Calvert Counties

829 pm /1000 pm Severe Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Anne Arundel and Calvert Counties

834 pm / 900 pm Tornado Warning issued by LWX

For Central and Northern Prince Georges Counties

847 pm /1000 pm Severe Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Anne Arundel and Calvert Counties

850 pm /1100 pm Special Marine Warning issued by LWX

For the Chesapeake Bay north of the Potomac River

903 pm / 930 pm Tornado Warning issued by BWI (radar assisted by LWX)

For west central Kent County, Maryland

908 pm /1100 pm Severe Weather Statement issued by LWX

For Kent County, Maryland

955 pm /1200 am Flash Flood Warning issued by LWX

For Harford County, Maryland

1001 pm/1030 pm Tornado Warning issued by LWX

For Harford County

1001 pm/1200 am Flash Flood Warning issued by LWX for BWI

For Cecil County, Maryland

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September 09, 2004

 


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