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OKX WRF Model Information

This is an experimental high resolution WRF model running at approximately 4 km horizontal resolution. For a description please see: http://wrf-model.org/index.php

We are running the NMM core of WRF EMS Version 3...non-hydrostatically using a cluster of 2 -Dual 2.4 GHZ Xeon Processor Linux machines with 1GB RAM with:

- A 285x223 grid centered at 74.8W 40.1 N
-- A RUC personal tile dataset for the initial conditions to initialize the model.
- A GFS personal tile dataset for the lateral boundary conditions to initialize the model.
- A MODIS static surface dataset to supplement the model initial and lateral boundary conditions.
- A 30-second land-sea mask for high resolution depiction of coast shorelines.
- No (convective) cumulus paramaterization.
- The New Ferrier Microphysics Scheme            
- The Mellor-Yamada-Janjic Boundary Layer scheme            
- The NMM Land surface scheme .                         
- The GFDL long wave radiation scheme      
- The GFDL short wave radiation scheme

- The output is available at 1-h forecast increments to 30-hr and is run 8 times a day.
- We use a GRADS script developed by Daniel Leins to create the graphics to post to the web page.

We expect to use the model qualitatively to help refine phenomena related to terrain and marine influence. Things like orographically forced precipitation and sea breeze fronts seem to be handled well in a general sense, but the exact placement and magnitude of weather features is not expected to be perfect, as is the case with any model. It should, however, give some clues about how complex terrain can affect the atmosphere.

This is an experimental and research model that is not supported operationally. It may not always be available, may have errors, or be changed without notice to support local research and model experimentation.

Special thanks to Bob Rozumalski and Daniel Leins