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The 17-18 February 2007 Northwest Flow Snowfall Event

Blair S. Holloway
NOAA/National Weather Service
Greer, SC

Snow in Flat Springs, NC at 2300 UTC 18 February 2007.

Intersection of Flat Springs Rd. and Stoney Hollow Rd. in Flat Springs, North Carolina around 2300 UTC 18 February 2007. Image courtesy of Dr. Baker Perry, used by permission.

Author's Note: The following report has not been subjected to the scientific peer review process.

1.  Event Snowfall Overview
Total snowfall accumulations for the 17-18 February 2007 northwest flow
snowfall (NWFS) event ranged from trace amounts to an event maximum of 
10 inches on Mt. Sterling in Haywood County (Fig. 1).  Other notable 
storm totals include 7 inches in Graham County along the Cherohala Skyway,
7 inches on Beech Mountain (Avery County), 6 inches in Mars Hill (Buncombe 
County), and 5.5 inches in Flat Springs (Avery County).  The irregular 
snowfall accumulation and distribution is typical of NWFS events and has 
been documented in numerous other cases including 11-13 February 2006 and 
9 January 2007, just to name a few.
Map of event snowfall accumulations as reported 
by spotters, cooperative observers, and county officials.
Figure 1.  Map of event snowfall accumulations as reported by spotters, 
cooperative observers, and county officials.
2.  Synoptic Features and Radar Imagery
This NWFS event occurred as an upper level trough moved eastward across
the eastern third of the country, tracking across the western Carolinas 
and northeast Georgia between 0000 and 1200 UTC 18 February (Fig. 2).  At 
the surface, a weak low pressure system and frontal boundary was located 
immediately west of the Mississippi River Valley at 1200 UTC 17 February 
(Fig. 3).  The front then tracked east, moving through the North Carolina 
Mountains by 0000 UTC 18 February 2007 (Fig. 3).  While some precipitation 
occurred in advance of the approaching frontal boundary, much of the 
precipitation began following the frontal passage. Snow showers were 
concentrated along the North Carolina/Tennessee border around 0400 UTC 18 
February (Fig. 4), and continued across the area through the early part 
of 18 February, diminishing greatly by around 1500 UTC (Fig. 4).
Storm Prediction Center (SPC) objective analysis of 500 mb geopotential height, temperature, and wind at 0000 UTC 18 February 2007.Storm Prediction Center (SPC) objective analysis of 500 mb geopotential height, temperature, and wind at 1200 UTC 18 February 2007.

Figure 2. Storm Prediction Center (SPC) objective analysis of 500 mb geopotential height, temperature, and wind at 0000 UTC 18 February 2007 (left) and 1200 UTC 18 February 2007 (right). Click on images to enlarge.

Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC) surface fronts and pressure analysis at 1200 UTC 17 February 2007.Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC) surface fronts and pressure analysis at 0000 UTC 18 February 2007.

Figure 3. Hydrometeorological Prediction Center (HPC) surface fronts and pressure analysis at 1200 UTC 17 Febrary 2007 (left) and 0000 UTC 18 February 2007 (right). Click on images to enlarge.

Radar reflectivity mosaic at 0359 UTC 18 February 2007.  Image from http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/radar/.Radar reflectivity mosaic at 1456 UTC 18 February 2007.  Image from http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/radar/.

Figure 4. Radar reflectivity mosaic at 0359 UTC 18 February 2007 (left) and 1456 UTC 18 February 2007 (right). Image from http://www.rap.ucar.edu/weather/radar/. Click on images to enlarge.

3.  Observations from Flat Springs, North Carolina
One of the most useful tools available for observing weather, especially
precipitation, is radar data.  The images available from this type of 
data allow forecasters to track the movement and intensity of various 
precipitation features, including anything from thunderstorms to snow.  
However, the utility of conventional radar data, produced by a Weather 
Surveillance Radar 88 Doppler (WSR-88D), is quite limited for NWFS events 
in the southern Appalachians.  Over the North Carolina Mountains, the main 
issues include radar beam blockage and range from the radar.  These issues 
make it difficult to view NWFS snow showers across the North Carolina 
Mountains, and especially along the Tennessee border.  Other types of 
radars, such as those that are vertically pointing, can provide radar images
at specific locations that are blocked from a WSR-88D's view.  One such 
radar is located at 3340 ft. in Flat Springs, North Carolina, in the 
northern tip of Avery County.


The MicroRainRadar (MRR) at this location allows for the viewing of snow
showers moving over the radar throughout the NWFS event.  A period of 
snow showers affected Flat Springs between 1900 UTC 17 February and 0000 
UTC February (Fig. 5), prior to the passage of the frontal boundary 
(Fig. 3).  Preceeding the passage of the front, 1.7 inches snow accumulated 
at the location of the radar with 0.10 inches of snow-water equivalent 
(SWE).  The majority of the total snowfall for the event fell after 0000 UTC 
18 February, with 3.6 inches of accumulation and only 0.14 inches of SWE.  
Two main things stand out in the Flat Springs data after 0000 UTC 18 February.  
First, the snow showers that affected this location were only about 4000 feet 
deep, with a few periods where the depth was even shallower.  In fact, 
periods of heavy snow have been shown to occur in a relatively shallow 
cloud layer in other parts of the country (Waldstreicher 2002).  Secondly, 
the snow-to-liquid ratios were as high as 50:1 from 1200 UTC to 1800 UTC, 
and from 1800 UTC to 0000 UTC 19 February.  Overall, for the entire event, 
5.5 inches of snow fell with 0.24 inches of SWE.  This equates to an 
event snow-to-liquid ratio of approximately 23:1.
MicroRainRadar data image for the time period 1200 UTC 17 February 2007 and 0000 UTC 19 February 2007.  Image from Dr. Sandra Yuter's Cloud and Precipitation Processes and Patterns Group, North Carolina State University.  Image made available by Dr. Baker Perry

Figure 5. MicroRainRadar (MRR) data image for the time period 1200 UTC 17 February 2007 and 0000 UTC 19 February 2007. Snowfall and snow-water-equivalent (SWE) for each time period indicated. Image from Dr. Sandra Yuter's Cloud and Precipitation Processes and Patterns Group, North Carolina State University. Image made available by Dr. Baker Perry. Click on image to enlarge.

4.  Summary 
Overall, 17-18 February 2007 was a high impact NWFS event, producing
total snowfall accumulations of up to 10 inches across the counties 
adjacent to the Tennessee border.  The event occurred as an upper level 
trough moved east of the Mississippi River Valley, pushing a weak low 
pressure system and frontal boundary across the southern Appalachians.  
The majority of the precipitation during the event affected the counties 
closest to the Tennessee border and occurred after the front moved through 
western North Carolina.  Detailed observations from Flat Springs, North
Carolina, revealed several noteworthy features of this NWFS event.  First, 
much of the snowfall in this area occurred in a shallow cloud layer that 
was only about 4000 feet deep.  Also, snow-to-liquid ratios for the entire 
event averaged 23:1, with embedded periods of ratios as high as 50:1.  
These two observations show that only a shallow layer of moisture is 
necessary for a NWFS event, and that even relatively small amounts of 
liquid precipitation can result in significant snowfall accumulations.
Reference
Waldstreicher, J. S., 2002: A foot of snow from a 3000-foot cloud: The 
     ocean-effect snowstorm of 14 January 1999. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,
     83, 19-22.
Acknowledgements
The upper air analysis and sounding graphics were obtained from the Storm 
Prediction Center and surface analyses were obtained from the Hydrometeor-
ological Prediction Center. Radar mosaic images were obtained from the 
University Corporation for Atmospheric Research.  Also, a special thanks 
to Dr. Baker Perry, Appalachian State University, and Dr. Sandra Yuter and
the Cloud and Precipitation Processes and Patterns Group, North Carolina 
State University, for the MRR data and observations from Flat Springs.
 


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