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NWS Newport/Morehead City, NC
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Winter Hazards - Wind Chill

RISK LEVEL
HAZARD DESCRIPTION
Low
  • Wind Chills are expected in the single digits. Frostbite can occur very quickly.
Moderate
  • Wind Chills 0 to -14 degrees F will result in rapid onset of frostbite to exposed skin. Wind chills at these values are dangerous. Exposure to the elements for humans and pets should be limited. The National Weather Service will Issue a Wind Chill Advisory for wind chills expected in this range.
High
  • Wind Chills -15 degrees F or lower are extremely dangerous. Frostbite will occur quickly to exposed skin. The National Weather Service will issue Wind Chill Warnings for wind chills expected to be this cold.

General Information

Exposure to cold can cause frostbite or hypothermia and become life-threatening. Infants and elderly people are most susceptible. Wind Chill is not the actual temperature, but rather how wind and cold feel on exposed skin. As the wind increases, heat is carried away from the body at an accelerated rate, driving down the body temperature. Animals are also affected by wind chill; however, cars, plants and other objects are not.

For additional information visit:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/winter/index.shtml
Wind Chill Safety Tips:

Know the Signs of Frostbite

Frostbite is an injury to the body caused by freezing body tissue. The most susceptible parts of the body are the extremities such as fingers, toes, ears, or the tip of the nose. Symptoms include a loss of feeling in the extremity and a white or pale appearance. Medical attention is needed immediately for frostbite. The area should be SLOWLY re-warmed.

Know the Signs of Hypothermia

Hypothermia is abnormally low body temperature (below 95 degrees Fahrenheit). Warning signs include uncontrollable shivering, memory loss, disorientation, incoherence, slurred speech, drowsiness, and apparent exhaustion. Medical attention is needed immediately. If it is not available, begin warming the body SLOWLY.

Know How to Dress During Cold Weather

  • Wear layers of loose-fitting, lightweight, warm clothing. Trapped air between the layers will insulate you. Outer garmets should be tightly woven, water repellant, and hooded.
  • Wear a hat, because 40% of your body heat can be lost from you head.
  • Cover your mouth to protect your lungs from extreme cold.
  • Mittens, snug at the wrist, are better than gloves.
  • Try to stay dry and out of the wind.

This Outlook is an Experimental Product for Planning purposes Only!!!

The local frost/freeze hazard graphics are valid for roughly a 24 hour period from the time of issuance (between 4 AM and 6 AM) until 8 AM the following morning. The highest expected risk possible for the duration of the graphic will be depicted. Only one of the listed criteria needs to be met fo inclusion in a higher risk category

Updates will be posted for significant forecast changes and as time permits. As the weather threat increases throughout the day, or becomes imminent, tornado watches and/or warnings will be issued.

The outlook graphics are an effort to improve the interpretation of our outlooks and statements. This product is provided for emergency managers, law enforcement, schools, local media, businesses, and the public. Use the graphical hazardous weather outlook to factor the threat of hazardous weather into your daily plans.


DISCLAIMER: This is an experimental service designed to supplement pre-existing, official means of communication. Timeliness and reliability of products obtained from the Internet are not guaranteed.

Click here for a detailed product description.
Click here to complete a customer feedback survey for this experimental product.
Send e-mail with your comments and suggestions to John Cole.
This project is being developed in an effort to achieve goals set forth in the National Weather Service's Strategic Plan.

Updated 11/30/2004